Lesson Plans

Removal of the Cherokee

Students analyze primary sources to investigate the removal of the Cherokee from their lands in the state of Georgia, then participate in a mock Congressional debate on the Indian Removal Act. After, students create a product of their choice that explains, and defends the rights of a minority group whose rights are being denied in order to…

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Did We Overcome?

Students analyze primary sources to deepen understanding of Jim Crow laws and the discrimination they perpetuated, how civil rights protests helped secure civil rights, and make connections between the past and recent events. After, students will create a pamphlet, modeled after the historical document they analyzed, that illustrates, defines, and discusses an instance where they…

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The Long Civil Rights Movement

Students will analyze primary sources to investigate the long arc of the civil rights movement by examining economic and social conditions and actions that were taken prior to and after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. After, students will interview a local civil rights activist and/or design an action plan to make…

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Champions of Change

Students analyze a variety of primary sources to consider how African American song took root as a means of spreading the message of equality  and as a critical part in unifying America in the struggle. After, students investigate the influence of contemporary music and musicians on memorializing the successes of the past and emphasizing the…

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Making a Mark: Marching & Leaping Towards Reform

Students make connections between protest, reform, and legacy through investigation of the 1963 March on Washington, Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech, the poem “Crossing” by Jericho Brown, and an excerpt of a conversation about leaving a legacy to your country with poet, teacher, and activist Sonia Sanchez. After, students consider civic…

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We Shall Overcome

Students analyze historical and contemporary primary sources to examine how citizens persevered to overcome injustice and affect change during the 1960s civil rights era and consider the lessons the first March to Selma and the events that followed in 1965 provide for us today.

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Let the Children March

Pair the picture book, Let the Children March, with primary sources to have students investigate the beliefs of the marchers and their supporters. After, students can tell the story, in words or pictures, of a march they have participated in or a march they could imagine themselves participating in because they passionately support that cause.

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