Lesson Plans

At School

Students compare and contrast school historical and contemporary classrooms and extended day care school programs and the value they provide to communities.

Family Customs Past and Present: Exploring Cultural Rituals

Students analyze primary sources to investigate rituals and customs of various cultures, then interview family members to deepen their understanding of their own cultural celebrations.

Suffrage Strategies: Voices for Votes

Students examine a variety of primary source documents related to the women’s suffrage movement to identify different methods people used to influence and change attitudes and beliefs about suffrage for women. Students then create original documents encouraging citizens to vote in current elections.

Cesar Chavez & Good Citizenship

Using Cesar Chavez as an example, students read articles, analyze primary sources and create living pictures to consider how good citizens contribute to their communities and work together to affect change.

Teamwork, Community, Culture

Students analyze primary sources to launch an inquiry into teamwork, how community can happen in public spaces between friends, family, and neighbors and the common links between celebrations of culture that we all share.

United States: Biggest Business in the World

Students analyze an historical campaign ad from the 1920 presidential election to consider the purpose and power of political campaign pledges. After, students explore the tactic of comparing the United States to a business both in historical and contemporary contexts.

Preamble to the Constitution Image Sequencing

Students develop their civics vocabulary and deepen their understanding of the preamble to the U.S. Constitution with this primary source image sequencing activity. After, students work together to create a class preamble that describes the purpose and function of their classroom community.

Introduction to the Constitution

In preparation to learn about the rights and responsibilities detailed in the U.S. Constitution and the purpose for its structure of government, students develop their ability to compare and contrast documents and make their own historical interpretations as they complete a close reading of the Preamble. After, students put the Preamble into their own words.

Making a Declaration – Beginning

Students investigate the Declaration of Independence as a founding document of the United States, then consider the historical and contemporary relevance of its most famous phrase and how it relates to a personal  vision of the American dream.

Making a Declaration – Intermediate

Students investigate the importance of the Declaration of Independence as a founding document of the United States, then consider the historical and contemporary relevance of its most famous phrase and how it relates to a personal vision of the American dream.

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